How to answer A Level Politics Source Questions

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A Level Politics Source Questions

A Level Politics Source Questions can often be a daunting prospect for students. These questions require careful analysis and understanding of the provided sources, as well as the ability to construct a well-structured and supported argument. In this article, we will discuss the format of A Level Politics source questions in your exams, how to effectively plan the essay, pick out the main arguments from the source, and structure paragraphs by using the source as the main basis of the argument.

The format of A Level Politics Source Questions

In A Level Politics exams, sources can take various forms, such as newspaper articles, speeches, or extracts from political texts. It is essential for students to familiarise themselves with different types of sources and understand their biases, intended audience, and overall context. This knowledge will enable them to critically evaluate the reliability and credibility of the information presented in the source.

Planning the essay and identifying main arguments

Before diving into answering A Level Politics source questions, it is crucial to spend some time planning the essay. This involves carefully reading and analysing the provided source(s) to identify the main arguments and key points. By doing so, you can ensure that your essay is focused and effectively addresses the topic at hand. This should only take around 5 minutes as you need to use the rest of the time to write your essay.

When identifying the main arguments, it is important to consider the author’s perspective and any underlying assumptions. This will help students to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the arguments presented in the source. Additionally, students should be able to recognise any counterarguments or alternative viewpoints that may be relevant to the question to provide balance to the debate.

Structuring paragraphs using the source as the main basis

Once the main arguments have been identified, it is time to structure the essay. Each paragraph should have a clear topic sentence that directly relates to the question and uses evidence from the source. By using the source as the main basis of the argument, you can demonstrate your understanding of the material and effectively engage with the source.

It is important to note that while the source should form the foundation of the argument, you should also incorporate your own knowledge and understanding of the topic in question. This can be done by providing additional evidence or examples, drawing on relevant theories or concepts, and critically assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the arguments presented in the source.

Reaching a conclusion supported by the source

As the source question progresses, students should aim to reach a well-reasoned conclusion that is supported by the source. This involves synthesising the main arguments and evidence from the source and drawing a logical and coherent conclusion. The conclusion should demonstrate the student’s ability to critically evaluate the source and effectively apply it to the question at hand.

It is important to remember that the conclusion should not simply restate the main points made in the essay. Instead, it should provide a concise summary of the key arguments and their implications, while also offering some critical insights or suggestions for further research.

Summary: A Level Politics Source Questions

To conclude, answering A Level Politics source questions in exams requires careful planning, critical analysis, and effective use of the provided sources. By understanding the format of sources encountered in exams, identifying main arguments, structuring paragraphs around the source, and reaching a conclusion supported by the source, students can confidently tackle these A Level Politics source questions and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of political issues.

Remember that you can always find in-depth advice about how to master A Level Politics source questions and other essay structures, timings and planning guidance as part of our Exam Guidance course, included in all Study Politics memberships.